Sunday, 5 October 2008

A fairy tale...

Neuschwanstein Castle (German: Schloss Neuschwanstein, lit. New Swan Stone palace;) is a 19th-century Bavarian palace on a rugged hill near Hohenschwangau and Füssen in southwest Bavaria, Germany.
The conception of the palace was outlined by Ludwig II in a letter to Richard Wagner, dated May 13, 1868;


“ It is my intention to rebuild the old castle ruin at Hohenschwangau near the Pollat Gorge in the authentic style of the old German knights' castles... the location is the most beautiful one could find, holy and unapproachable, a worthy temple for the divine friend who has brought salvation and true blessing to the world.
(Below, a church in Fussen).
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The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as a homage to Richard Wagner, the King's inspiring muse. Although public photography of the interior is not permitted, it is the most photographed building in Germany and is one of the country's most popular tourist destinations.(Below... my version of the famous Neuschwanstein).
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Ludwig did not allow visitors to his castles, but since its opening in 1886, over 50 million people have visited the Neuschwanstein Castle. About 1.3 million people visit annually, with up to 6,000 per day in the summer.The palace has appeared in several movies, and was the inspiration for Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland Park and for the Cinderella Castles at the Magic Kingdom and Tokyo Disneyland.
(Below, the best view of the castle from marien-brucke)
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The palace is owned by the state of Bavaria, unlike nearby Hohenschwangau Castle, which is owned by Franz, Duke of Bavaria. The Free State of Bavaria has spent more than €14.5 million on Neuschwanstein's maintenance, renovation and visitor services since 1990.
(Below, Hohenschwangau Castle)
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The palace comprises a gatehouse, a Bower, the Knight's House with a square tower, and a Palas, or citadel, with two towers to the Western end. The effect of the whole is highly theatrical, both externally and internally
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Unfortunately, the king, never lived to see his lovely castle... He was found drowned in the lake one day, and no one knows whether it is a homocide or a suicide.
What a waste!

2 comments:

Stardust said...

Hi,

I visit your blog from time to time, love your pictures of tour around Europe ( I love Europe! ), and I really must thank you for sharing them and making my day.
Neuschwanstein Castle is a landmark I hope to visit during my lifetime ( I failed to when I went to Germany ). Your pictures are like a fairytale come true. =)

God bless.

J.H said...

hello stardust,
I believe you are the girl who often left comments on ellena's blog. (Hey we can be blog-mates!)
Thanks for all the kind words. I love the picture you've taken as well, they are so beautiful!
p.s: has been wanting to visit japan again :-)